Full Body Workout Routine

Full Body Workout Routine

A full-body workout is a type of exercise routine that involves working on all the major muscle groups in the body during a single session. Full-body workouts can be an efficient and effective way to improve muscle strength, endurance, and overall fitness. Customizable to various fitness levels and goals.

Day 1: Full Body Resistance Training

Warm up with 5-10 minutes of light cardio (such as jogging or cycling).

Complete 3 sets of 8-12 reps of the following exercises, with a 1-2 minute rest between sets:

  • Squats
  • Lunges
  • Push-ups
  • Rows
  • Planks
  • Calf raises

Cool down with 5-10 minutes of stretching.

Day 2: Active Rest

Go for a 30-minute walk or bike ride at a moderate intensity.
Do some gentle stretching.

Day 3: Upper Body Resistance Training

Warm up with 5-10 minutes of light cardio (such as jogging or cycling).

Complete 3 sets of 8-12 reps of the following exercises, with a 1-2-minute rest between sets:

  • Bench press
  • Bicep curls
  • Tricep dips
  • Shoulder press
  • Lat pull-downs

Cool down with 5-10 minutes of stretching

Day 4: Active Rest

Go for a 30-minute jog or swim at a moderate intensity.
Do some foam rolling or self-massage to recover from the previous workouts.

Day 5: Lower Body Resistance Training

Warm up with 5-10 minutes of light cardio (such as jogging or cycling).

Complete 3 sets of 8-12 reps of the following exercises, with a 1-2-minute rest between sets:

  • Deadlifts
  • Leg press
  • Glute bridges
  • Leg curls
  • Step-ups

Cool down with 5-10 minutes of stretching

Day 6: Full Body Resistance Training

Warm up with 5-10 minutes of light cardio (such as jogging or cycling).

Complete 3 sets of 8-12 reps of the following exercises, with a 1-2-minute rest between sets:

  • Squats
  • Lunges
  • Push-ups
  • Rows
  • Planks
  • Calf raises

Cool down with 5-10 minutes of stretching

Day 7: Cardio

Go for a 45-minute hike or bike ride at a moderate to high intensity.

Finish with 5-10 minutes of stretching to cool down.

It is just one example of a resistance training routine that includes two active rest days and essential cardio.

An active rest immediately after the first day of the sample resistance training routine is a general recommendation to allow the body time to recover after a workout. In addition, it can help reduce the risk of injury and overtraining and support muscle growth and repair.

Active rest refers to low-intensity physical activity that does not significantly strain the worked muscle in the previous workout. Active rest can include walking, stretching, yoga, or foam rolling.

Including active rest days within a training program can be beneficial for several reasons. It can help reduce muscle soreness, improve flexibility, and boost overall recovery. Active rest can also provide a mental break from more intense training, which can help reduce the risk of burnout and improve motivation.

However, it’s important to note that everyone’s recovery needs differ. It may be necessary to adjust the frequency and intensity of active rest days based on individual factors such as age, fitness level, and overall health. It’s always a good idea to consult a healthcare professional or a certified personal trainer before starting any new exercise program.

Cool down with stretching

The purpose of a cool down is to gradually lower the heart rate, help the body transition from an intense exercise state to a resting state, and reduce the risk of muscle soreness and stiffness. A cool down can also help improve flexibility and range of motion, and can aid in overall recovery.

The specific components of a cool down may vary depending on the type and intensity of the workout that was completed, as well as the individual’s fitness level and goals. However, a typical cool down might include activities such as light cardio (such as walking or jogging), stretching, and foam rolling.

The recommended duration of a cool down will also depend on the length and intensity of the workout, but a general guideline is to spend 5-10 minutes gradually reducing the intensity of physical activity and stretching the major muscle groups that were worked during the workout. It’s important to listen to your body and adjust the cool down to meet your needs and comfort level.

Types of stretching

There are several different types of stretching that can be included in a cool down, and the best type of stretching for you will depend on your individual needs and goals. Some common types of stretching include:

  • Static stretching: This type of stretching involves holding a stretch for a period of time, usually 15-30 seconds, without bouncing or moving. Static stretching is often used to improve flexibility and range of motion.
  • Dynamic stretching: This type of stretching involves moving through a range of motion, often with the help of momentum. Dynamic stretching is often used as a warm up to prepare the body for physical activity, but it can also be incorporated into a cool down.
  • PNF stretching: This type of stretching, also known as proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation, involves contracting the muscle being stretched and then relaxing it. PNF stretching is often used to improve flexibility and is typically done with the help of a partner or therapist.
  • Self-myofascial release: This type of stretching involves using a foam roller, lacrosse ball, or other tool to apply pressure to tight or sore muscles. Self-myofascial release can be used to improve flexibility and muscle recovery.

It’s generally recommended to include a combination of static and dynamic stretching in a cool down, focusing on the major muscle groups that were worked during the workout. It’s also a good idea to listen to your body and adjust the type and duration of stretching based on your needs and comfort level.

Stretching examples

  1. Neck stretches:
  • Tilt your head to the right, bringing your right ear towards your right shoulder. Hold for 15-30 seconds, then switch sides.
  • Tilt your head forward, bringing your chin towards your chest. Hold for 15-30 seconds, then tilt your head back, looking towards the ceiling. Hold for 15-30 seconds.
  1. Shoulder stretches:
  • Reach your right arm across your body and use your left hand to gently pull it towards your left shoulder. Hold for 15-30 seconds, then switch sides.
  • Bring your right arm behind your back and use your left hand to gently pull it towards your left shoulder blade. Hold for 15-30 seconds, then switch sides.
  1. Chest stretches:
  • Clasp your hands behind your back and straighten your arms, lifting your chest towards the ceiling. Hold for 15-30 seconds.
  • Step forward with one foot and place your hands on your front knee, keeping your back leg straight. Lean forward, stretching your chest and shoulders. Hold for 15-30 seconds, then switch legs.
  1. Hip stretches:
  • Step forward with your left foot and bend your knee, keeping your right leg straight behind you. Place your hands on your left knee and push your hips forward, feeling a stretch in the front of your right hip. Hold for 15-30 seconds, then switch sides.

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